ServiceTechMag.com > Issue LI: June 2011

Issue LI, June 2011

Confronting SOA's Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse

Philip Wik

Philip Wik

SOA's Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse represent domains that can bring failure to an enterprise's SOA efforts; security, performance, change management, and testing. Governance must bridge the gap between the promise of SOA and its realization. This article provides a structure of analysis that can help address each of these four areas. Outlined against a blue-gray October sky, the Four Horsemen rode again. In dramatic lore their names are Death, Destruction, Pestilence, and Famine. However, those names are their aliases. Their real names are: Stuhldreher, Crowley, Miller and Layden. They formed the crest of the South Bend cyclone before which another fighting Army team was swept over the precipice at the Polo Grounds this afternoon as 55,000 spectators peered down upon the bewildering panorama spread out upon the green plain below.Grantland Rice, a sportswriter for the former New York Herald Tribune, linked this Biblical image of terror to football players Harry Stuhldreher, Don Miller, Jim Crowley, and Elmer Layden after Notre Dame's 13-7 upset victory over the Army in October, 1924...


RESTful Automation and Governance

Ashwini Kumar

Ashwini Kumar

We are witnessing phenomenal growth in the adoption of open and proprietary REST-based services. Enterprises are increasingly turning to them for lightweight HTTP-based distributed services and to model Service-Oriented Architectures. Such a proliferation mandates the use of policy-based governance, so that the developed artifacts coexist harmoniously with supporting automation tools. It is through such coexistence that enterprises and organizations can take advantage of enhanced productivity and quality gains. This article describes an approach of utilizing HTTP content negotiation in the context of JAX-RS-based RESTful service and the WADL service description to govern the versioning, language encoding, and payload dimensions of services. Given the possible number of combinations for client scenarios, the service must adapt its response in order to be usable. For instance, the client and server may have completely in-dependent lifecycles since they are typically developed and managed by independent teams...


Empowering the Discipline of Cloud Integration - Part II

Pethuru Cheliah

Pethuru Cheliah

Service-Oriented Architecture, the architectural style and scheme for the enterprise IT, is creating strategically significant opportunities for the worldwide IT industries as well as business organizations. SOA has impacted service providers, consulting companies and product vendors alike in planning and picking up new avenues for extra and sustainable revenues. Enterprise executives are equally optimistic about the success of the SOA paradigm towards transitioning theirs to on-demand and resilient in their operations, dealings, and deliveries to partners, employees, vendors, and and customers. SOA guarantees business flexibility and continuity, whereas business optimization and transformation are being given a fresh start with the acceptance of SOA. Service is the construction component for producing mission-critical and enterprise-scale service-oriented systems. Furthermore, services, not like other building-blocks, show glimpses of the appropriate application integration, modernization, and composition entity. Enterprise IT has benefited from SOA in streamlining and simplifying the hard-to-crack tasks such as legacy-enablement and enterprise integration...


Mapping Service-Orientation to TOGAF 9 - Part II:
Architecture Adoption, Service Inventories and Hierarchies

Filippos Santas

Filippos Santas

Activities and factors related to the SOA Adoption Planning are typically examined during the Project Establishment iteration in TOGAF. This iteration consists of the Preliminary Phase and Phase A: Architecture Vision. The architectural inputs and objectives of these phases fit well with the objectives of the SOA Adoption Planning. For example, the inputs of the Preliminary Phase include: scope of organizations impacted; maturity assessment, gaps, and resolution approach; roles and responsibilities for architecture team(s); budget requirements; governance and support strategy; existing Architecture Framework, if any, including: architecture method, architecture content (deliverables and artifacts), and configured and deployed tools; Architecture Principles; and Architecture Repository.The above correspond to the inputs of the SOA projects. SOA provides explicit definitions and models for each of the above elements. Notice that the architecture principles are defined in the Preliminary Phase in TOGAF and in the SOA Adoption Planning in SOA. That is, all principles of service-orientation have to be included in the framework during the Preliminary Phase...


2017 2016 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006